8 Things That Happen As A Result Of True Leadership

Beatrice Beard | March 11, 2020

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If a team is to function properly It requires quality leadership. It’s not uncommon to have development groups, sports teams, or corporations fail because they lack strong leadership. Here we’ll look at eight things that happen as a result of true leadership.

1. Improved Team Focus

It’s very common that a group has the skills and aptitudes required for success but lacks the direction to be successful. This scenario often arises in product and software development, and the development team can get bogged down focusing on features that add no real value to the product or system. Effective leadership will correct this issue, ensuring that the group focuses on what is most important.

2. Clear Performance Metrics Are Established

Good leadership should be able to tell their team when they’re meeting expectations or not. Usually, this comes in the form of quantifiable metrics which are outlined with their team and agreed upon beforehand.

3. The Team Gets Better at Fire Fighting

One aspect of life we all know to be true is that unexpected circumstances often arise. Being able to confront these issues head-on in a clear and collected manner is extremely valuable. A leader who can provide this is certain to gain the trust and confidence of his or her team.

4. Positive Change In Environment and Culture

A good leader is able to take a toxic or stagnant culture and turn it into something positive. A poor culture or work environment is one of the leading causes of lackluster performance. Many studies have drawn direct links between employee mood and performance. One of the best ways to improve an employee’s mood is by changing the culture in which they are operating.

5. The Team Knows the Expectations and Goals

A team needs a set of standards to operate on; they need to know what’s accepted and what’s not. Quite often, employees are not poor performers, they don’t know what the standard is. A bad leader will reprimand a member of his team right away. A good leader will make sure the employee understands the standard that is expected of them. Jason Green, a business writer at Writemyx and Britstudent, said, “Sometimes a member of one’s team does not know what standard to work to. This is often no fault of their own, but rather the fault of poor prior leadership”.

6. Greater Lessons Learned from Failure(s)

Failure can be one of the most difficult emotions to manage. When a group or team fails it’s up to leadership to pick them back up. This aspect of quality leadership is particularly important because while failure can, at times, be devastating, it’s also the best education. Ensuring that one’s team takes more positive than negative from failure is the mark of a good leader.

7. Promotes Improved Consistency

Consistency is one of the most challenging things for a team to maintain. The most common example of this is sports. Some teams perform very well for periods of time, then go on long stretches of poor play. The cause of this is usually entirely mental. A good leader can demand consistency from his team.

8. You’ll Get The Most Out Of People

Quality leaders are those who can get members of their team to perform to the best of their ability. This is a skill that’s difficult to articulate in any meaningful way, some are just naturally able to do it well. Though using the skills outlined above is a great way to start. 

 

In closing, remember: A good leader must always lead by example and encourage their team or teams to work together collaboratively. One of the most apparent effects of quality leadership is that people now have an example to follow; they are able to see someone else performing well, and follow their lead.

Beatrice Beard is a professional copywriter at Coursework Help and Academicbrits. Her ability to write on a wide variety of topics has given her the ability to share advice and her personal experiences on how to write content that sells. This advice can be found at PhDkingdom.

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